Legendary Nintendo head Satoru Iwata dies at 55

The gaming community mourns the loss of one of the industry’s greatest minds

SAN FRANCISCO, CA - MARCH 2:  In this handout image provided by Nintendo of America, Satoru Iwata, president of Nintendo Co. Ltd., gives the keynote address at the Game Developers Conference March 2, 2011 in San Francisco, California. Iwata announced Super Mario in 3D for the Nintendo 3DS portable video game system. (Photo by Kim White/Nintendo of America via Getty Images)

July 11, 2015 will go down as a very sad day in the memories of everyone in the gaming community. From gamers to developers to publishers and executives, Iwata was an inspirational and important figure in the industry.

Iwata lost his battle with ongoing medical issues on Saturday at the age of 55. The president and CEO of Nintendo was undergoing medical procedures for the better part of a year, missing E3 last year and being represented by a puppet and video Nintendo Direct at this year’s show.

According to GameSpot, “Iwata was first appointed as the director of Nintendo in June 2000. He was promoted to the position of president and representative director of Nintendo in 2002, following the resignation of Hiroshi Yamauchi. He also assumed responsibilities as chief executive of Nintendo of America in 2013.”

All across the industry, gamers and industry members are pouring out support via Twitter and other means. One of Nintendo’s (and gaming’s) most respected creators Shigeru Miyamoto said in a statement, “I am surprised at this sudden news and overcome with sadness.”

Iwata, who died due to complications of a bile duct growth, worked on some of gaming’s most iconic series such as Kirby and Balloon Fight and led Nintendo from the GameCube era through the Wii U era. Sac City Gamer is deeply saddened by this news and we send our thoughts to Iwata’s family, friends, co-workers and fans.

Satoru Iwata. 1959 - 2015.

Satoru Iwata. 1959 – 2015.

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